An Introduction to Jean Paul Sartre

Jean Paul Sartre had a great influence on many areas of modern thought. A writer of prodigious brilliance and originality, Sartre worked in many different genres: as a philosopher, a novelist, and a cultural critic. Sartre is one of the key figures in the philosophy of Existentialism, which emphasises the existence of the individual orContinue reading “An Introduction to Jean Paul Sartre”

An Introduction to Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky (pronounced dos-toy-ev-ski) is most popularly known as a Russian novelist as well as a philosopher. His works explore human psychology in the troubled socio-political atmosphere of 19th century Russia. His novels had a great impact on psychology, the study of how the human mind works, especially of people who lose their reason, whoContinue reading “An Introduction to Fyodor Dostoevsky”

The Ultimate Truth: Subjectivity – Kierkegaard

The world is absurd, and we must live in it. “As I grew up, I opened my eyes and saw the real world, I began to laugh and I haven’t stopped since”. – Søren Kierkegaard One can try making sense of life by laying a worldview or template on it, but Kierkegaard would guarantee you thatContinue reading “The Ultimate Truth: Subjectivity – Kierkegaard”

Angst & Despair – Kierkegaard

Kierkegaard spends most of his writing talking about concepts such as anxiety or angst and despair. The Sickness Unto Death is a life changing book about the despair of not being one’s true self and also quite short at around a few hundred pages long, depending on the version. One of his famous quotes isContinue reading “Angst & Despair – Kierkegaard”

Fear and Trembling: The Religious and the Ethical – Kierkegaard

Fear and Trembling is a thrilling and enthralling book as well as a great introduction to Kierkegaard, it is also relatively short at around 200 pages (Either/Or and Stages on Life’s Way are around 800 pages long!) To recap the previous posts on Kierkegaard, we know that he presents three stages on life’s way: theContinue reading “Fear and Trembling: The Religious and the Ethical – Kierkegaard”

Stages on Life’s Way: The Religious – Kierkegaard

Kierkegaard’s second book Stages on Life’s Way was written as a continuation of his masterpiece Either/Or where he introduced the Aesthetic and the Ethical stages. In Stages on Life’s Way, Kierkegaard introduces a third stage: the Religious. Kierkegaard was a Christian, but if you compared him to every other Christian you’ve ever met, he’s aContinue reading “Stages on Life’s Way: The Religious – Kierkegaard”

Either/Or: The Aesthetic and the Ethical – Kierkegaard

In his first published book Either/Or, Kierkegaard portrays two life views: the aesthetic and the ethical. Kierkegaard wants you to think about them as individual existences. In other words, at any given time, you’re always going to be in one of these existences, an individual is either aesthetic or ethical, even though they might overlap.Continue reading “Either/Or: The Aesthetic and the Ethical – Kierkegaard”

An Introduction to Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Kierkegaard was a profound and prolific 19th century writer and philosopher in the Danish Golden Age of intellectual and artistic activity. Although he would argue that he wasn’t a philosopher since all he did was write about life, how we choose to live and what it means to be alive, centred in the individualContinue reading “An Introduction to Søren Kierkegaard”

Nietzsche – God Is Dead: The Decline of Christianity

Perhaps one of Nietzsche’s most famous statements is his proclamation of the death of god: “God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under ourContinue reading “Nietzsche – God Is Dead: The Decline of Christianity”

Nietzsche on Human Nobility

Nietzsche speaks of the idea of vornehmheit or human nobility. That it is not within knowledge per se. Knowledge is not something one can have like a detached thing that one possesses, but rather the knowing subject has to live his knowledge, it becomes associated to how much truth one can endure. The nobility inContinue reading “Nietzsche on Human Nobility”